Recent Fire Damage Posts

6 Things to know about Fire

5/14/2019 (Permalink)

1. Understand the fire triangle 
A simplified cousin to the fire tetrahedron, the triangle represents the three components that fires need to exist: heat, oxygen and fuel. If one of these components is missing, a fire can’t ignite.

2. Fire kills
Every year more than 3,800 people die fire related deaths in the U.S. Approximately 18,300 people are injured every year in fires. Most of these fires could have been prevented by practicing proper fire safety and having fire alarms. On average more than 60 firefighters die every year in the line of duty.

3. It's in the kitchen
Most house fires start in the kitchen. Cooking is the leading cause of home fire injuries. Cooking fires often start from overheated grease and unattended cooking. Electric stoves are involved in more fires than gas stoves.

4. Leading causes of death
Another fact about fire is that smoking is the primary cause of death by fire in the U.S. The second cause of fire deaths is heating equipment.

5. Arson
Arson is the third most common cause of home fires. Arson in commercially operated buildings is the major reason for fire deaths and injuries in those types of properties.

6. Smoke inhalation
More people die from smoke inhalation than flames. Fire can suck all of the oxygen from a room and replace it with poisonous smoke and gases before flames even reach a room. Many times people die from lack of oxygen before the fire reaches their room.

SERVPRO of Lincoln specializes in the cleanup and restoration of residential and commercial property after a fire, smoke or water damage event. We can handle any size disaster!

Call us at (402) 466-4004

Find more facts about fire at https://www.firerescue1.com/fire-products/Firefighter-Accountability/articles/1206336-9-facts-about-fire/

Clean Your Dryer Vents

12/20/2018 (Permalink)

One of the most common causes of fires is also perhaps the most preventable.

Dryer vents connect from your clothes dryer, and can build up lint. If not cleaned out properly, the air cannot flow properly, and a fire can result. This type of fire happens most frequently in homes, posing dangers to adults and children.

According to the U.S. Fire Administration, 2,900 home clothes dryer fires are reported each year. These fires cause an estimated 5 deaths, 100 injuries, and $35 million in property loss. The U.S. Fire Administration also reports that the leading cause of home clothes dryer fires is failure to clean them (34 percent).

Apart from cleaning your dryer vent, the U.S. Fire Administration has suggestions to enhance safety when using your clothes dryer:

  • Don’t use a clothes dryer without a lint filter or with a lint filter that is loose, damaged or clogged.
  • Don’t overload the dryer.
  • Don’t use a wire screen or cloth to cover the wall damper. They can collect lint and clog the dryer vent.
  • Don’t dry anything containing foam, rubber or plastic. An example of an item not to place in a dryer is a bathroom rug with a rubber backing.
  • Don’t dry any item for which manufacturers' instructions state “dry away from heat.”
  • Don’t dry glass fiber materials (unless manufacturers' instructions allow).
  • Don’t dry items that have come into contact with anything flammable like alcohol, cooking oils or gasoline. Dry them outdoors or in a well-ventilated room, away from heat.
  • Don’t leave a clothes dryer running if you leave home or when you go to bed.

SERVPRO of Lincoln specializes in the cleanup and restoration of residential and commercial property after a fire, smoke or water damage event; as well as mold remediation. We can handle any size disaster!

Call us today at 402.466.4004

Choosing the Right Fire Extinguisher

12/18/2018 (Permalink)

A fire extinguisher can be a life-saving tool when used correctly. The U.S. Fire Administration (USFA) recommends individuals are properly trained in order to use and maintain an extinguisher.

USFA says an extinguisher should only be used if:
• You have alerted other occupants and someone has called the fire department.
• The fire is small and contained to a single object, such as a wastebasket.
• You are safe from the toxic smoke produced by the fire.
• You have a means of escape identified and the fire is not between you and the fire escape route.
• Your instincts tell you that it is safe to use an extinguisher.


Classes of Fire Extinguishers:

  • Class A: Use on ordinary combustible materials, such as cloth, wood, rubber, paper, and many plastics.
  • Class B: Use on flammable liquids, such as grease, gasoline and oil.
  • Class C: Use on appliances, tools, or other equipment that is electrically energized or plugged in.
  • Class D: Use on flammable metals and are often specific for the type of metal in question. These are typically found only in factories working with these metals.
  • Class K: Use on vegetable oils, animal oils, or fats in cooking appliances. These are generally found in commercial kitchens, but are suitable for the residential market.

SERVPRO of Lincoln specializes in the cleanup and restoration of residential and commercial property after a fire, smoke or water damage event; as well as mold remediation. We can handle any size disaster!

Call us today at 402.466.4004

Holiday Lights and Christmas Trees

12/14/2018 (Permalink)

The holiday season is upon us and Christmas decorating is in full swing.  For many people it is a tradition to decorate for Christmas and is something that is shared with the family and many others.  Whether you only decorate the interior of the home or you decorate both the interior and exterior, decorations and lights certainly add to the splendor of the Christmas season. According to the National Fire Protection Association fire departments responded to an average of 200 homes for structure fires related to Christmas trees between 2011-2015. Avoid Christmas tree and light related fires by following these simple safety tips.

Trees

When purchasing live Christmas trees, check for freshness and try to avoid dry trees. When you are cutting the tree, cut 1-2 inches from the base of the trunk to ensure optimal water absorption. Live trees require plenty of water. Make sure that you are checking the tree daily and watering when needed. If you prefer an artificial tree, ensure that the tag reads “Fire Resistant”. When placing the trees in your home, ensure that they are placed at least 3 feet away from all heat sources.

Lights

Check all lights to ensure that there are no worn or broken cords or loose bulbs. If you find any damage, dispose of the damaged lights and replace. When purchasing lights be sure to check the label that shows whether or not they are for indoor or outdoor use and purchase accordingly. In addition, read the instructions included with the lights. Most recommend that you plug no more than three strands together so that you are not overloading the socket. Last but not least, turn ALL Christmas lights off when going to bed or leaving the home.

If you find yourself with a damage this holiday season, call our office at 402-466-4004. Our team will evaluate your damage and give you a clear explanation of the restoration process.

Tips for Staying Safe this Holiday Season

12/4/2018 (Permalink)

The winter holiday season is traditionally a festive and eventful time of year.  Celebrations, family gatherings and house guests can increase in number during the season.  However, statistics show that the incidents of home fires and electrical accidents also typically increase during this time of year. 

Pretty lights, candles and decorations are just a few of the items bringing charm and cheer to the holiday season. However, if they are not used carefully, your holidays may go from festive to frightening.   The American Red Cross offers the following safety tips to help greatly reduce the fire risk in your home or business this holiday season: 

  • Place Christmas trees, candles and other holiday decorations at least three feet away from heat sources like fireplaces, portable heaters, radiators, heat vents and candles.
  • Make sure that light strings and other holiday decorations are in good condition.  Do not use anything with frayed electrical cords and always follow the manufacturer's instructions.
  • Always unplug tree and holiday lights before leaving the property or going to bed.
  • Never use lit candles to decorate a tree.  Always extinguish candles before leaving the room or going to bed.
  • Use only sturdy tree stands designed not to tip over.  Keep curious pets and children away from Christmas trees.
  • Keep anything that can catch on fire--pot holders, oven mitts, wooden utensils, paper or plastic bags, food packaging, and towels or curtains-away from your stove top. 
  • After a party, designate one person to walk around your property to ensure all candles and smoking materials are properly extinguished after guests leave.

 Encourage family, friends, colleagues and neighbors to follow these simple safety tips.  We want everyone to be safe and happy during this magical time of year. Contact Us
If fire or water damage strikes your home or business during the holidays, give us a call. We are on call 24 hours a day, 356 days a year.  SERVPRO Professionals have been helping keep homes merry and bright for more than 45 years.
Contact SERVPRO of Lincoln at (402)466-4004

http://www.SERVPROlincoln.com

Safety Tips when using a Space Heater

10/15/2018 (Permalink)

Nothing can take the chill out of a cold room quite like a space heater, but they are also dangerous, 40-percent of home heating fires are caused by space heaters. Before purchasing a space heater, it is important to think about how you will be using it. Will it be used for supplemental heat in colder rooms or other areas, or will it be used for emergency heat? As a general rule of thumb, electric space heaters are typically safer than portable fuel-burning models (e.g. natural gas, propane, kerosene.) When choosing a unit try to find one that is listed or labeled by a nationally recognized testing laboratory such as CSA (Canadian Standards Association), UL (Underwriters Laboratories), or ETL (Intertek). Doing this will ensure that the heater’s construction and performance meet voluntary safety standards. Continue reading for some tips for keeping your home or office safe while using a space heater. While some may seem obvious, others may surprise you:

  • Protect with Smoke Alarms -Make sure you have smoke alarms/carbon monoxide on every floor of your home and they are tested them regularly.
  • Keep it Level -Always make sure the space heater on a hard, level and non-flammablesurface
  • Use a Timer - Many models feature programmable timers that can be used to program automatic on and off times for when you sleep or head to work.
  • Area Free of Flammable Liquids- Do not put them on easily ignitable or combustible surfaces, such as rugs or carpets, or use them to dry wet clothing.
  • Don't Extend the Power Line -Avoid using an extension cord. Plug a space heater directly into an outlet with enough capacity.
  • Remember the 3 Feet Rule -Ensure the space heater is at least 3ft away from anything that isn’t non-flammable.
  • Keep it a Kid Free Zone -Keep children and pets away from space heaters.
  • Clean Your Space Heater -Be sure to clean your space heater regularly, and follow your manufacturer’s guide for specific advice on maintenance and inspection.
  • Don't Leave it Running -Never leave a space heater on when you leave.

Most space heaters will warm you up, but not all are created equal. The best space heater will included safety features like tip-over protection and UL certification. It should also be easy to move and operate, dispersing heat without wasting energy. Below is a great website you can use to find the best space heater for you and your needs.

https://www.reviews.com/space-heater/

Contact Us
If fire or water damage strikes your home or business, give us a call. We are on call 24 hours a day, 356 days a year. SERVPRO Professionals have been helping home and business owners for more than 45 years. ContactSERVPROof Lincoln at (402)466-4004 or SERVPROilncoln.com

It Is Possible to Preserve Contents After A Fire!

8/27/2018 (Permalink)

Preserving The Contents Of Your Fire              Damaged Home

Fire damage, including smoke and soot, affects not only the structure of your house but also your belongings. SERVPRO of Lincoln understands your family’s furniture, clothing, keepsakes, and other belongings are the very things that make a house a home.

Contents Restoration

SERVPRO of Lincoln technicians specialize in restoring contents damaged by fire. Their expertise and “restore” versus “replace” mentality can help you save money while preserving precious keepsakes that can’t be replaced. They pretest your belongings to determine what items they can restore to pre-fire condition. They use several methods of cleaning your contents, including:

  • Dry Cleaning - Used for cleaning light residues or to pre-clean prior to wet cleaning.
  • Wet Cleaning - An effective cleaning method for removing moderate to heavy residues.
  • Spray and Wipe -Effective for items that can’t withstand wet cleaning.
  • Foam Cleaning - Used for upholstery fabrics that might shrink or bleed if wet cleaned.
  • Abrasive Cleaning - Involves agitation of the surface being cleaned.
  • Immersion Cleaning - Contents are dipped into a bath of the cleaning product.



Staying Safe During Sub Zero Temperatures

12/29/2017 (Permalink)

Winter has arrived, along with bitter cold and freezing temperatures. In an effort to keep living spaces cozy, many residents turn to alternative heat sources. The most common supplemental heat source is a portable space heater. These devices can generate a lot of extra heat, but if used improperly, can also create serious safety hazards. Consider the following tip to minimize risks of a heating related fire.

  • Always turn off portable heaters when going to bed or leaving a room.
  • Have heating equipment and chimneys cleaned and inspected each year by a qualified professional.
  • Keep space heater at least 3 feet from and obstructions

SERVPRO of Lincoln specializes in the cleanup and restoration of commercial and residential property after a water damage event. Our staff is highly trained in property damage restoration. From initial and ongoing training at SERVPRO’s corporate training facility to regular IICRC-industry certification, rest assured our staff is equipped with the knowledge to restore your property.

The Do's And Don'ts Of Extension Cord Use

12/21/2017 (Permalink)

The U.S. Consumer Product Safety Commission (CPSC) estimates that each year, about 4,000 injuries associated with electric extension cords are treated in hospital emergency rooms. About half of the injuries involve fractures, lacerations, contusions or sprains from people tripping over extension cords. CPSC also estimates that about 3,300 residential fires originate in extension cords each year, killing 50 people and injuring about 270 others. The most frequent causes of such fires are short circuits, overloading, damage and/or misuse of extension cords. The Do's and Don'ts of using an extension cords. Do's

  • Use extension cords only when necessary and only on a temporary basis.
  • Use extension cords that are the correct size or rating for the equipment in use. The diameter of the extension cord should be the same or greater than the cord of the equipment in use.
  • Only use cords rated for outdoor use when using a cord outside.
  • Keep electrical cords away from areas where they may be pinched and areas where they may pose a tripping or fire hazard (e.g., doorways, walkways, under carpet, etc.).
  • Always inspect the cord prior to use to ensure the insulation is not cut or damaged, exposed conducting wires can put you at risk for fire, burns and electrical shock. Discard damaged cords, cords that become hot, or cords with exposed wiring.

 Don'ts

  • Do not use extension cords in place of permanent wiring.
  • Never unplug an extension cord by pulling on the cord; pull on the plug.
  • Do not remove the prongs of an electrical plug. If plug prongs are missing, loose, or bent, replace the entire plug.
  • Do not use an adapter or extension cord to defeat a standard grounding device. (e.g., only place three-prong plugs in three-prong outlets; do not alter them to fit in a two-prong outlet.)
  • Do not run cords above ceiling tiles or through walls.

      Extended exposure to outdoor conditions can cause cords to deteriorate, so whether they're rated for indoors or outdoors, store all extension cords inside when they’re not in use. Regardless of whether or not it's being used, as long as a power extension cord is plugged into an outlet, it's conducting electricity. To avoid potential safety hazards, always remember to unplug extension cords when they're not in use! 

Cleaning Smoke Damage

12/21/2017 (Permalink)

When the firefighters leave, it may seem like the danger has passed and the home is safe from further destruction.  While fire may be the immediate danger, once it is gone, what it leaves behind will continue to affect the house.  Ash and smoke, if left untouched, will cause extensive corrosion, etching and discoloration.  Also  powerful lingering odors. The only way to properly clean smoke and fire damage is to be extremely thorough. This entire process is very detailed.  Ash residue is easily disturbed and can spread through the building with ease, causing everything to need restoration.                                                                  

  Things You need to Know About Smoke Damage  

  1. Smoke Migrates to Cooler Areas: The behavior of smoke during a fire is largely dependent on temperature. Smoke is typically hot and migrates to cooler regions of your home. Unfortunately, the cooler regions of your home are often hard to reach places, like cabinets and the underside of furniture. This makes the cleaning process much more difficult and is one of the major consequence of smoke damage. 
  2. Smoke Uses Plumbing to Migrate Through Your House: Smoke naturally travels through plumbing systems, using holes around pipes to travel from floor to floor. This is the best way for smoke to travel throughout homes and buildings and cause further damage. Vents and plumbing systems are cleaned and often replaced if smoke damage is great enough. 
  3. Wet, Smoldering Fires Produce the Most Damaging Smoke: The type of fire and the type of smoke produced by the fire make a huge difference when it comes to cleaning smoke damage. Wet, smoldering fires produce highly volatile and noxious smoke, the effects of which can persist for years if not cleaned properly. 
  4. High Temperature Fires Produce Easier to Clean Smoke Damage: Contrary to what you might believe, high temperature fires tend to be less damaging than smoldering fires. That is because they burn very quickly and produce a different type of smoke that contains less damaging soot. As a result, even though the high temperature fire may seem like it would produce more damage, you may just get lucky. 
  5.   A Very Damaging Component of Smoke is Invisible: While the billowing clouds of dark smoke may seem the likely culprit, it’s the invisible protein residues of smoke that can also cause server damage. These residues can break down metal, wood, paint, and even porcelain, and their highly volatile chemical make-up allows them to penetrate deep into almost any substance while remaining totally invisible. Beware of this invisible enemy! 
  6. Smoke Damage Can destroy Metal and Wood Items: You might think that hearty substance like wood and metal would not be affected by smoke as much as upholstery and textiles. You’d be wrong. The noxious protein residues in smoke can break down brass, copper, wood, and even stone, causing them to decay at an ultra rapid rate. Be sure to let a professional know about the exposure of wood and metal items to smoke and the duration of the exposure. 

  1. The Number 1 Rule to Prevent Lasting Smoke Damage: Get Air Moving: If you want to get a head start on cleaning up your home after smoke damage, follow the cardinal rule. Get air moving.  Use fans and open windows to keep air circulating throughout your home. This will prevent any remaining smoke residues from penetrating even deeper into your house and property.

Tips For Staying Safe in Lincoln NE During This Holiday Season

12/5/2017 (Permalink)

The winter holiday season is traditionally a festive and eventful time of year.  Celebrations, family gatherings and house guests can increase in number during the season.  However, statistics show that the incidents of home fires and electrical accidents also typically increase during this time of year. 

Pretty lights, candles and decorations are just a few of the items bringing charm and cheer to the holiday season. However, if they are not used carefully, your holidays may go from festive to frightening.   The American Red Cross offers the following safety tips to help greatly reduce the fire risk in your home or business this holiday season: 
  • Place Christmas trees, candles and other holiday decorations at least three feet away from heat sources like fireplaces, portable heaters, radiators, heat vents and candles.
  • Make sure that light strings and other holiday decorations are in good condition.  Do not use anything with frayed electrical cords and always follow the manufacturer's instructions.
  • Always unplug tree and holiday lights before leaving the property or going to bed.
  • Never use lit candles to decorate a tree.  Always extinguish candles before leaving the room or going to bed.
  • Use only sturdy tree stands designed not to tip over.  Keep curious pets and children away from Christmas trees.
  • Keep anything that can catch on fire--pot holders, oven mitts, wooden utensils, paper or plastic bags, food packaging, and towels or curtains-away from your stove top. 
  • After a party, designate one person to walk around your property to ensure all candles and smoking materials are properly extinguished after guests leave.
 Encourage family, friends, colleagues and neighbors to follow these simple safety tips.  We want everyone to be safe and happy during this magical time of year. Contact Us
If fire or water damage strikes your home or business during the holidays, give us a call. We are on call 24 hours a day, 356 days a year.  SERVPRO Professionals have been helping keep homes merry and bright for more than 45 years.
Contact SERVPRO of Lincoln at (402)466-4004http://www.SERVPROlincolneast.com

Things You Need To Know About Smoke Damage

10/16/2017 (Permalink)

http://www.SERVPROlincolneast.com/fire-smoke-damage-restorationWhen the firefighters leave, it may seem like the danger has passed and the home is safe from further destruction.  While fire may be the immediate danger, once it is gone, what it leaves behind will continue to affect the house. Ash and smoke will cause extensive corrosion, etching and discoloration not to mention powerful lingering odors. The only way to properly clean smoke and fire damage is to be extremely thorough. This entire process is very detailed. Ash residue is easily disturbed and can spread through the building with ease, causing nearly everything to need restoration.                                                                 

Things You need to Know About Smoke Damage  

1. Smoke Migrates to Cooler Areas: The behavior of smoke during a fire is largely dependent on temperature. Smoke is typically hot and migrates to cooler regions of your home. Unfortunately, the cooler regions of your home are often hard to reach places, like cabinets and the underside of furniture. This makes the cleaning process much more difficult and is one of the major consequence of smoke damage. 

2. Smoke Uses Plumbing to Migrate Through Your House: Smoke naturally travels through plumbing systems, using holes around pipes to travel from floor to floor. This is the best way for smoke to travel throughout homes and buildings and cause further damage. Vents and plumbing systems are cleaned and often replaced if smoke damage is great enough. 

3. Wet, Smoldering Fires Produce the Most Damaging Smoke: The type of fire and the type of smoke produced by the fire make a huge difference when it comes to cleaning smoke damage. Wet, smoldering fires produce highly volatile and noxious smoke, the effects of which can persist for years if not cleaned properly.  

4. High Temperature Fires Produce Easier to Clean Smoke Damage: Contrary to what you might believe, high temperature fires tend to be less damaging than smoldering fires. That is because they burn very quickly and produce a different type of smoke that contains less damaging soot. As a result, even though the high temperature fire may seem like it would produce more damage, you may just get lucky. 

5. A Very Damaging Component of Smoke is Invisible: While the billowing clouds of dark smoke may seem the likely culprit, it’s the invisible protein residues of smoke that can also cause server damage. These residues can break down metal, wood, paint, and even porcelain, and their highly volatile chemical make-up allows them to penetrate deep into almost any substance while remaining totally invisible. Beware of this invisible enemy!

6. Smoke Damage Can destroy Metal and Wood Items: You might think that hearty substance like wood and metal would not be affected by smoke as much as upholstery and textiles. You’d be wrong. The noxious protein residues in smoke can break down brass, copper, wood, and even stone, causing them to decay at an ultra rapid rate. Be sure to let a professional know about the exposure of wood and metal items to smoke and the duration of the exposure. 

7. The Number 1 Rule to Prevent Lasting Smoke Damage: Get Air Moving: If you want to get a head start on cleaning up your home after smoke damage, follow the cardinal rule. Get air moving.  Use fans and open windows to keep air circulating throughout your home. This will prevent any remaining smoke residues from penetrating even deeper into your house and property.

Will Extension Cords Cause Damage or Injury At Your Business?

9/15/2017 (Permalink)

The U.S. Consumer Product Safety Commission (CPSC) estimates that each year, about 4,000 injuries associated with electric extension cords are treated in hospital emergency rooms. About half of the injuries involve fractures, lacerations, contusions or sprains from people tripping over extension cords. CPSC also estimates that about 3,300 residential fires originate in extension cords each year, killing 50 people and injuring about 270 others. The most frequent causes of such fires are short circuits, overloading, damage and/or misuse of extension cords. The Do's and Don'ts of using an extension cords. Do's 

  •          Use extension cords only when necessary and only on a temporary basis.
  •          Use extension cords that are the correct size or rating for the equipment in use. The diameter of the extension cord should be the same or greater than the cord of the equipment in use.
  •                   Keep electrical cords away from areas where they may be pinched and areas where they may pose a tripping or fire hazard (e.g., doorways, walkways, under carpet, etc.).
  •          Always inspect the cord prior to use to ensure the insulation is not cut or damaged, exposed conducting wires can put you at risk for fire, burns and electrical shock.   Discard damaged cords, cords that become hot, or cords with exposed wiring.

 Don'ts 

  •          Do not use extension cords in place of permanent wiring.
  •          Never unplug an extension cord by pulling on the cord; pull on the plug. 
  •          Do not remove the prongs of an electrical plug. If plug prongs are missing, loose, or bent, replace the entire plug.
  •          Do not use an adapter or extension cord to defeat a standard grounding device. (e.g., only place three-prong plugs in three-prong outlets; do not alter them to fit in a two-prong outlet.)         
  •          Do not run cords above ceiling tiles or through walls.

      Extended exposure to outdoor conditions can cause cords to deteriorate, so whether they're rated for indoors or outdoors, store all extension cords inside when they’re not in use. Regardless of whether or not it's being used, as long as a power extension cord is plugged into an outlet, it's conducting electricity. To avoid potential safety hazards, always remember to unplug extension cords when they're not in use!  

Important Safety Tips For Using A Space Heater!

1/5/2017 (Permalink)

Follow These Guidelines When Using A Space Heater

 Space heaters can take the chill out of a cooler room, but they can also be dangerous, as 40-percent of home heating fires are caused by space heaters.  Before purchasing a space heater, it is important to consider how it will be used. Will it be used for supplemental heat in colder rooms or other areas, or will it be used for emergency heat? As a general rule of thumb, electric space heaters are typically safer than portable fuel-burning models (e.g. natural gas, propane, kerosene.)  Remember to choose a unit that is listed or labeled by a nationally recognized testing laboratory such as UL (Underwriters Laboratories), CSA (Canadian Standards Association) or ETL (Intertek). This will ensure that the heater’s construction and performance meet voluntary safety standards.Below are some tips for keeping your home or office safe while using a space heater.  While some may seem obvious, others may surprise you: 

  • Keep It Level  Always place a space heater on a hard, level and non flammable surface
  • Remember the 3 Feet Rule  Ensure the space heater is at least 3 ft away from anything that can burn.
  • Keep It A Kid Free Zone  Keep children and pets away from space heaters.
  • Don't Leave It Running  Never leave a space heater on when you leave.
  • Protect With Smoke Alarms  Install smoke alarms/carbon monoxide on every floor of your home and test them regularly.
  • Don't Extend Yourself  Avoid using an extension cord.  Plug a space heater directly into an outlet with enough capacity.
  • Areas Where Space Heaters Are Used Should Be Free Of Flammable Liquids.  Do not put them on easily ignitable or combustible surfaces, such as rugs or carpets, or use them to dry wet clothing.
  • Use A TimerMany models feature programmable timers that can be used to program automatic on and off times for when you sleep or head to work.
  • Clean Your Space Heater  Be sure to clean your space heater regularly, and follow your manufacturer’s guide for specific advice on maintenance and inspection.

Any space heater will warm you up, but not all are created equal. The best space heater will included safety features like tip-over protection and UL certification. It should also be easy to move and operate, dispersing heat without wasting energy.

https://www.reviews.com/space-heater/

 Contact Us
If fire or water damage strikes your home or business, give us a call.  We are on call 24 hours a day, 356 days a year. SERVPRO Professionals have been helping home and business owners for more than 45 years.Contact SERVPRO of Lincoln at (402)466-4004 http://www.SERVPROlincolneast.com/

Celebrate Safely This Holiday Season

12/13/2016 (Permalink)

 

Celebrate Safely This Holiday Season
 
 
 
 
The holiday season is a time for gathering with friends and family to enjoy fellowship and quality time.  While you're busy with decorating and baking, it is important to remember safety.  
 
Pretty lights, candles and decorations are just a few of the items bringing charm and cheer to the holiday season.  However, if they are not used carefully, your holidays may go from festive to frightening.  
 
The American Red Cross offers the following safety tips to help greatly reduce the fire risk in your home or business this holiday season:
 
  • Place Christmas trees, candles and other holiday decorations at least three feet away from heat sources like fireplaces, portable heaters, radiators, heat vents and candles.
  • Make sure that light strings and other holiday decorations are in good condition.  Do not use anything with frayed electrical cords and always follow the manufacturer's instructions.
  • Always unplug tree and holiday lights before leaving the property or going to bed.
  • Never use lit candles to decorate a tree.  Always extinguish candles before leaving the room or going to bed.
  • Use only sturdy tree stands designed not to tip over.  Keep curious pets and children away from Christmas trees.
  • Keep anything that can catch on fire--pot holders, oven mitts, wooden utensils, paper or plastic bags, food packaging, and towels or curtains-away from your stovetop. 
  • After a party, designate one person to walk around your property to ensure all candles and smoking materials are properly extinguished after guests leave.
  • One of every three home Christmas tree fires is caused by electrical problems.
  • Although Christmas tree fires are not common, when they do occur, they are more likely to be serious.  On average, one of every 31 reported home Christmas tree fires results in a death compared to an average of one death per 144 total reported home fires.
  • A heat source too close to the tree causes one in every 4 Christmas tree fires.
  • Two out of five home decoration fires are started by candles with one-third of candle fires starting in the bedroom.

 

 
Contact Us
If fire or water damage strikes your home or business during the holidays, give us a call.  We are on call 24 hours a day, 356 days a year.  SERVPRO Professionals have been helping keep homes merry and bright for more than 45 years.
Contact SERVPRO of Lincoln at (402)466-4004

October is Fire Prevention Month! Do You Have A Plan in Lincoln, NE?

10/11/2016 (Permalink)

 

 

  • In 2014, fires caused 2,745 deaths, 11,825 injuries, and $6.8 billion in property damage.

 

  • Three out of five house fire deaths happen in homes with no or non-working smoke alarms.

 

  •  Working smoke alarms cut the risk of dying in half in reported home fires.

 

  • In fires large enough to activate the smoke alarm, hardwired alarms operated 94% of the time, while battery powered alarms operated 80% of the time.

 

  • When smoke alarms fail to operate, it is usually because batteries are missing, disconnected, or dead.

 

  • One quarter of house fire deaths start in the bedroom.  Another quarter start in the living room, family room or den.

 

  • One third of surveyed respondents thought they would have at least 6 minutes before a fire in their home would become life-threatening.  The time is often much less.  Only 8% said their first thought on hearing a smoke alarm would be to get out. 

 

               CAN YOU EXIT IN UNDER 2 MINUTES?

 Fire experts agree, people have as little as 2 minutes to escape a burning home before it's too late to get out. Increase your chance of surviving by ensuring you have working smoke detectors in place, building an escape plan, and then practicing the plan.  The following are a few suggestions to help you develop an emergency escape plan in Lincoln, NE.

 

  • Draw a map of each level of your home and show all doors and windows.  Find two ways to get out of each room.  Make sure all doors and windows that lead outside open easily.
  • Consider escape ladders for sleeping areas on the 2nd and 3rd floors.  Store them near the window where they will be used.
  • Choose an outside meeting place a safe distance in front of your house.  Make sure to make the location of the meeting place on your escape plan.
  • Teach children how to escape on their own in case you cannot help them.  Plan for everyone in your home with special considerations for elderly or disabled individuals.
  • Practice your fire escape plan during the day and night time.

 

                Escape Planning For Your Business

 

Occupational Safety and Health Administration (OSHA) recommends building an emergency action plan to protect yourself, your employees, and your business during an emergency.  OSHA suggests the following steps when developing such a plan:

  • Organize an Emergency Preparedness Procedures review with employees to go over your company's emergency plan.
  • Once a plan is developed, post evacuation procedures, including routes and exits where they are easily accessible to all employees.  Ensure all exits and routes are clearly marked and well lit, wide enough to accommodate the number of evacuating personnel, and unobstructed and clear of debris at all times.
  • Conduct office evacuation exercises and drills.  Designate a safe spot outside of the facility where employees can regroup, recover and conduct a headcount. 

 

 

 

Protect your Home and Business! How to prevent electrical fires.

4/5/2016 (Permalink)

Does the area under your desk or around your entertainment devices look like this picture?  You are not alone!  In 2014, electricity consumption in the United States totaled nearly 3,863 billion kilowatt-hours.  Unless you are living "off the grid", you are using electricity to charge cell phones and laptops, wash and dry clothes, cook meals, brew your morning cup of coffee and heat your business.     Electrical power keeps people connected and allows people to do what they need to do. Even though most Americans recognize the benefits that come with electrical power, they must also understand that there is a responsibility that needs to be taken seriously to avoid injury or possible disaster.       According to Electrical Safety Foundation International, more than 50,000 fires in the home are attributed to electrical fires. These have resulted in almost 500 deaths and more than 1,400 injuries. The damage that has been done has totaled to more than $1.3 billion. Obviously, being careless with electrical power has very serious consequences.     Below are safety measures that you can use in your business and home to reduce the risk of electrical fires:  • Inspect your home and business for loose wires, faulty wiring, and shorts. If there are any issues, contact a qualified electrician. Also, use safety covers on outlets to protect children. • Make sure there are smoke detectors on each level of your home or business. Test them each month to make sure they are working properly.• If electrical equipment is making strange sounds or has a weird odor, turn them off. If there is water damage on your property, make sure that an expert inspects all electrical appliances. Do not plug them in or turn them on until they are safe. When water has damaged electrical appliances, they can be very dangerous.• Use safe cord practices. When cords are loose, frayed or cracked, repair them or replace them. Never place cords in high traffic areas, under rugs, or stapled to surfaces. Additional outlets can be installed by an electrician if necessary. Extension cords should only be utilized temporarily.• Light bulb wattage should be correct for the appliance being used.• During spring cleaning and while working near service meters or electrical lines, use caution. Consider hiring a professional to do the work if it is dangerous.• Flammable items should be kept away from electrical appliances.• Consider installing an arc fault circuit interrupter (AFCI) to reduce the chances of electrical fire in your home.• Avoid using electrical power tools outside after it has rained, or the area is wet. Never operate electrical equipment while barefoot.• Do not allow children to climb trees near power lines. Reduce the risk of electrical-related injuries by keeping balloons, kites, and other items away from overhead lines.Prevention is the best method to keep your family and property safe.

Why Professionals Should Clean Smoke Damage

1/15/2016 (Permalink)

While the principles behind fire restoration are fairly simple, it requires a lot of experience and manpower to perform adequately, and this means that it shouldn’t be attempted by a homeowner on his or her own.  Of course fire is always the immediate danger, but once it is gone, what it leaves behind will continue to affect the house. Ash and smoke, if left unhindered, will cause extensive corrosion, etching and discoloration, not to mention lingering powerful odors. Professionals that clean fire and smoke damage can stop this before it becomes a major problem, assuming they are contacted soon enough.

Who is qualified to do this type of work?

There are many companies that advertise their ability to restore areas affected by fire, but only those with proper training and certification should be considered. The Institute of Inspection Cleaning and Restoration Certification (IICRC) is the main oversight agency in this industry. The IICRC requires its registrants to take extensive coursework before earning their certification. The IICRC is the most respected certification organization in the remediation industry, and its certified technicians are held to a strict code of ethics designed to protect the consumer. 

IICRC technicians stake their reputation on every job, so they excel at both the technical and service demands of the job. These professionals can clean smoke damage and restore items affected by a fire, but they must be brought to the site as soon as possible to halt the ongoing issues that ash residue can cause. The first thing that ash does to the home is discolor most surfaces.

  • Anything that is made of plastic, or was close to the fire will start discoloring within minutes.
  • Within several hours, fiberglass and finishes on appliances will begin to yellow.

  • After a few days pass, the ash will cause walls to discolor permanently, along with clothing and upholstery. 

  • Wood and vinyl will need to be refinished or replaced, and metal will start corroding.

    If a professional isn’t hired to clean smoke and fire damage, the costs for restoration will skyrocket after a few weeks.

  • Carpet will permanently discolor
  • Glass may be severely etched, which will necessitate replacement
  • Odors caused by the disaster may still be present and intense enough to be distracting
  • Ash is acidic.  The longer it takes to hire experts, the more destruction it will cause.

 Call in the Professionals

The first thing a trained, certified, professional company will do when on site is to identify all affected materials and the source of any odors.   The experts will identify what can and cannot be salvaged, and will remove any built-up ash residue that is coating surfaces.

  • A thorough cleanup is the only way to completely rid the building of ash and debris, so the work is labor intensive. 
  • Technicians will first inspect the property to gauge where cleanup is needed the most and start there, working over every surface that may have been affected by the disaster. 

  •  Professionals use special agents that are designed to neutralize ash and smoke, and apply them to walls, ceilings, counter tops, furniture, and anything else that may be under siege by damaging ash and soot.

     Smoke odors are another issue that needs to be dealt with as it can seep through walls and deposit on inaccessible areas. Tearing down walls and ripping up floors to remove odor is not a preferred option, so technicians need something that can emulate the movements of smoke and soot. That’s where thermal foggers come in. 

  • Thermal foggers produces a concentration of odor neutralizing particles that are similar in size to soot and smoke particles

  • A thermal fogger can disperse a blanket of these particles nearly everywhere in the home, including behind walls and inside the ceiling. The process ensures proper removal of lingering odors from fire damage.  
  • It takes a lot of technical skill to effectively clean up the damage left behind by a disaster, and the best way for a technician to acquire this skill is by attaining certification. There is little time to waste when looking for a professional to clean up the damage, and certification can provide an effective shorthand method in tracking one down.  Choose a company for fire and water restoration with the appropriate licenses and proof that they have the proper insurance. Their safety and health certifications should be up to date, as well as their specialized training. Look for technicians that have been trained formally in schools approved by the Institute of Inspection Cleaning and Restoration Certification.   

    Recipe for Safety

    11/3/2015 (Permalink)

    Happy Thanksgiving from Your Friends at SERVPRO

    DID YOU KNOW?

    Thanksgiving is the peak day for home cooking

    fires, followed by Christmas Day and Christmas Eve.

    On average, there is a 183% increase in fire

    incidents on Thanksgiving Day.

    Each November, families gather to celebrate Thanksgiving by preparing a delicious feast.  If you don't practice safe cooking habits, your happy holiday could become hazardous very quickly.  According to the National Fire Protection Association, cooking is the main cause for home fires and injuries, with Thanksgiving being the peak day for cooking-related fires.  Review the following safety tips to ensure you can enjoy a safe holiday.  Some tips may seem obvious, but we all tend to get very rushed and that can lead to forgetfulness! 

  • Never leave cooking food unattended-stay in the kitchen when frying, grilling or broiling food.  

  • Check food regularly while cooking and remain in the home while cooking.   
  • Keep the kids away from the cooking area. 
  • Keep anything flammable--pot holders, oven mitts, wooden utensils, paper or plastic bags, food packaging, and towels--away from the stove, oven or any other appliance in the kitchen that generates heat. 
  • Do not wear loose clothing or dangling sleeves while cooking. 
  • Clean cooking surfaces on a regular basis to prevent grease buildup. 
  • Purchase a fire extinguisher to keep in the kitchen.   
  • Always check the kitchen before going to bed or leaving the home to make sure all stoves, ovens and small appliances are turned off. 
  • Install a smoke alarm near the kitchen, on each level of the home, near sleeping areas. 
  • Tips provided by the American Red Cross.  Statistics provided by the National Fire Protection Association. 

    Your local SERVPRO Franchise Professionals wish you a safe and happy holiday season. 

    Our Clients Say It Best                             

    The technician was extremely helpful and knowledgeable.  Very impressed! Thanks for the peace of mind and not having to worry about this anymore.
    Tony S. Lincoln, NE 

    We greatly appreciate your generous referrals. 

    Don't let your Extension Cords cause damage

    8/11/2015 (Permalink)

    The U.S. Consumer Product Safety Commission (CPSC) estimates that each year, about 4,000 injuries associated with electric extension cords are treated in hospital emergency rooms. About half of the injuries involve fractures, lacerations, contusions or sprains from people tripping over extension cords. CPSC also estimates that about 3,300 residential fires originate in extension cords each year, killing 50 people and injuring about 270 others. The most frequent causes of such fires are short circuits, overloading, damage and/or misuse of extension cords. The Do's and Don'ts of using an extension cords. Do's 

    •          Use extension cords only when necessary and only on a temporary basis.
     
    •          Use extension cords that are the correct size or rating for the equipment in use. The diameter of the extension cord should be the same or greater than the cord of the equipment in use.
     
    •          Only use cords rated for outdoor use when using a cord outside.
    •           Keep electrical cords away from areas where they may be pinched and areas where they may pose a tripping or fire hazard (e.g., doorways, walkways, under carpet, etc.).
     
    •          Always inspect the cord prior to use to ensure the insulation is not cut or damaged, exposed conducting wires can put you at risk for fire, burns and electrical shock.   Discard damaged cords, cords that become hot, or cords with exposed wiring.
     Don'ts 
    •          Do not use extension cords in place of permanent wiring.
     
    •          Never unplug an extension cord by pulling on the cord; pull on the plug. 
     
    •          Do not remove the prongs of an electrical plug. If plug prongs are missing, loose, or bent, replace the entire plug.
     
    •          Do not use an adapter or extension cord to defeat a standard grounding device. (e.g., only place three-prong plugs in three-prong outlets; do not alter them to fit in a two-prong outlet.)         
     
    •          Do not run cords above ceiling tiles or through walls.
          Extended exposure to outdoor conditions can cause cords to deteriorate, so whether they're rated for indoors or outdoors, store all extension cords inside when they’re not in use. Regardless of whether or not it's being used, as long as a power extension cord is plugged into an outlet, it's conducting electricity. To avoid potential safety hazards, always remember to unplug extension cords when they're not in use!  

    What you should know about Smoke Damage

    7/16/2015 (Permalink)

    Smoke damage to a bathroom

    Cleaning Smoke Damage From A Fire When the firefighters leave, it may seem like the danger has passed and the home is safe from further destruction.  While fire may be the immediate danger, once it is gone, what it leaves behind will continue to affect the house. Ash and smoke, if left unhindered, will cause extensive corrosion, etching and discoloration, not to mention powerful lingering odors. ? The only way to properly clean smoke and fire damage is to be extremely thorough. This entire process is very detailed.  Ash residue is easily disturbed and can spread through the building with ease, causing nearly everything to need restoration.                                                                       Things You need to Know About Smoke Damage  1.    Smoke Migrates to Cooler Areas: The behavior of smoke during a fire is largely dependent on temperature. Smoke is typically hot and migrates to cooler regions of your home. Unfortunately, the cooler regions of your home are often hard to reach places, like cabinets and the underside of furniture. This makes the cleaning process much more difficult and is one of the major consequence of smoke damage. 2.    Smoke Uses Plumbing to Migrate Through Your House: Smoke naturally travels through plumbing systems, using holes around pipes to travel from floor to floor. This is the best way for smoke to travel throughout homes and buildings and cause further damage. Vents and plumbing systems are cleaned and often replaced if smoke damage is great enough. 3.    Wet, Smoldering Fires Produce the Most Damaging Smoke: The type of fire and the type of smoke produced by the fire make a huge difference when it comes to cleaning smoke damage. Wet, smoldering fires produce highly volatile and noxious smoke, the effects of which can persist for years if not cleaned properly.  4.    High Temperature Fires Produce Easier to Clean Smoke Damage: Contrary to what you might believe, high temperature fires tend to be less damaging than smoldering fires. That is because they burn very quickly and produce a different type of smoke that contains less damaging soot. As a result, even though the high temperature fire may seem like it would produce more damage, you may just get lucky. 5.     A Very Damaging Component of Smoke is Invisible: While the billowing clouds of dark smoke may seem the likely culprit, it’s the invisible protein residues of smoke that can also cause server damage. These residues can break down metal, wood, paint, and even porcelain, and their highly volatile chemical make-up allows them to penetrate deep into almost any substance while remaining totally invisible. Beware of this invisible enemy! 6.    Smoke Damage Can destroy Metal and Wood Items: You might think that hearty substance like wood and metal would not be affected by smoke as much as upholstery and textiles. You’d be wrong. The noxious protein residues in smoke can break down brass, copper, wood, and even stone, causing them to decay at an ultra rapid rate. Be sure to let a professional know about the exposure of wood and metal items to smoke and the duration of the exposure. 7.    The Number 1 Rule to Prevent Lasting Smoke Damage: Get Air Moving: If you want to get a head start on cleaning up your home after smoke damage, follow the cardinal rule. Get air moving.  Use fans and open windows to keep air circulating throughout your home. This will prevent any remaining smoke residues from penetrating even deeper into your house and property.