Recent Storm Damage Posts

Preparing your house for a storm.

2/5/2019 (Permalink)

Cold temperatures can take their toll on your home and property, it is important that you prepare your home for cold weather to limit risks and potential damages. When preforming maintenance and insuring that you are limiting risks of damage it is important to be thorough while inspecting your home. There are many easy steps you can take to help in the attic of your home; weather strip & insulate the access door from your attic into your home,  seal  around your chimney with metal flashing or a high temperature sealant, seal around plumbing vents, seal any holes between the heated space and the attic and insulate any exposed water pipes. If water damage occurs in your home due to extreme weather or anything else, make sure to call SERVPRO of Lincoln.

SERVPRO of Lincoln specializes in the cleanup and restoration of residential and commercial property after a fire, smoke or water damage event. We can handle any size disaster!

Call us at (402) 466-4004

What to know about Tornadoes

10/15/2018 (Permalink)

Although tornadoes occur in many parts of the world, these destructive forces of nature are found most frequently in the United States east of the Rocky Mountains during the spring and summer months. In an average year, 800 tornadoes are reported nationwide, resulting in 80 deaths and over 1,500 injuries. A tornado is defined as a violently rotating column of air extending from a thunderstorm to the ground. The most violent tornadoes are capable of tremendous destruction with wind speeds of 250 mph or more. Damage paths can be in excess of one mile wide and 50 miles long. Once a tornado in Broken Bow, Oklahoma, carried a motel sign 30 miles and dropped it in Arkansas!

What Causes Tornadoes?
Thunderstorms develop in warm, moist air in advance of eastward-moving cold fronts. These thunderstorms often produce large hail, strong winds, and tornadoes. Tornadoes in the winter and early spring are often associated with strong, frontal systems that form in the Central States and move east. During the spring in the Central Plains, thunderstorms frequently develop along a "dryline," which separates very warm, moist air to the east from hot, dry air to the west. Tornado-producing thunderstorms may form as the dryline moves east during the afternoon hours. 

How Do Tornadoes Form?
Before thunderstorms develop, a change in wind direction and an increase in wind speed with increasing height creates an invisible, horizontal spinning effect in the lower atmosphere.  Rising air within the thunderstorm updraft tilts the rotating air from horizontal to vertical.  An area of rotation, 2 - 6 miles wide, now extends through much of the storm. Most strong and violent tornadoes form within this area of strong rotation

Tornadoes Take Many Shapes and Sizes
Weak Tornadoes

  • 69% of all tornadoes
  • Less than 5% of tornado deaths
  • Lifetime 1-10+ minutes
  • Winds less than 110 mph

Strong Tornadoes

  • 29% of all tornadoes
  • Nearly 30% of all tornado deaths
  • May last 20 minutes or longer
  • Winds 110-205 mph

Violent Tornadoes

  • Only 2% of all tornadoes
  • 70% of all tornado deaths
  • Lifetime can exceed 1 hour
  • Winds greater than 205 mph

Tornado Myths:
MYTH: Areas near rivers, lakes and mountains are safe from tornadoes. 
FACT: No place is safe from tornadoes. In the late 1980's, a tornado swept through Yellowstone National Park leaving a path of destruction up and down a 10,000 ft. mountain.
MYTH: The low pressure with a tornado causes buildings to "explode" as the tornado passes overhead. 
FACT: Violent winds and debris slamming into buildings cause most structural damage.
MYTH: Windows should be opened before a tornado approaches to equalize pressure and minimize damage. 
FACT: Opening windows allows damaging winds to enter the structure. Leave the windows alone; instead, immediately go to a safe place.

Tornadoes can occur at any time of the year

  • In the southern states, peak tornado occurrence is in March through May, while peak months in the northern states are during the summer.
  • Note, in some states, a secondary tornado maximum occurs in the fall.
  • Tornadoes are most likely to occur between 3 and 9 p.m. but have been known to occur at all hours of the day or night.
  • The average tornado moves from southwest to northeast, but tornadoes have been known to move in any direction. The average forward speed is 30 mph but may vary from nearly stationary to 70 mph.
  • The total number of tornadoes is probably higher than indicated in the western states. Sparse population reduces the number reported.

What to Listen For...

  • SEVERE THUNDERSTORM WATCH: Severe thunderstorms are possible in your area.
  • SEVERE THUNDERSTORM WARNING: Severe thunderstorms are occurring.
  • TORNADO WATCH: Tornadoes are possible in your area. Remain alert for approaching storms.
  • TORNADO WARNING: A tornado has been sighted or indicated by weather radar. If a tornado warning is issued for your area and the sky becomes threatening, move to your pre-designated place of safety.

Remember, tornadoes occasionally develop in areas in which a severe thunderstorm watch or warning is in effect. Remain alert to signs of an approaching tornado and seek shelter if threatening conditions exist. Environmental CluesLook out for:

  • Dark, often greenish sky
  • Wall cloud
  • Large hail
  • Loud roar; similar to a freight train

Caution: Some tornadoes appear as a visible funnel extending only partially to the ground.
Some tornadoes are clearly visible while others are obscured by rain or nearby low-hanging clouds. It's Up to YOU! 
Each year, many people are killed or seriously injured by tornadoes despite advance warning. Some did not hear the warning while others received the warning but did not believe a tornado would actually affect them. This preparedness information, combined with timely severe weather watches and warnings, could save your life in the event a tornado threatens your area. After you have received the warning or observed threatening skies, YOU must make the decision to seek shelter before the storm arrives. It could be the most important decision you will ever make.

Overflowing Storm Drains Can Cause Flood Damage To Crete Homes

9/14/2018 (Permalink)

SERVPRO of Lincoln Remediates Flooding After Storms or Snow Melts

Rainfall and melted snow provide our lawns with the water they need to grow well, but not all of the water that falls on your property ends up soaking into the ground of your Lincoln property. Much of it runs off into the street where it travels down to the drainage system.

When a neighborhood contains many trees or other debris sources, homes in the Crete area can become flood damaged. When these drains become clogged, they force the water to either continue down the street or to overflow into yards and parking lots. This can happen in any neighborhood.

We at SERVPRO make sure that each one of our customers receives the level of service their own unique needs require. We understand that floods do more than just damage the interior of the home. Flooding also affects the exterior of the home, as well as the yard. No matter where flooding damages your property, or how severe that damage becomes, we handle all aspects of restoration and quickly make it “Like it never even happened.”


SERVPRO of Lincoln is always ready to help local families recover from flood damage and other catastrophes that affect their dwellings. Call us at (402) 466-4004 so we can help your family move forward after a flooding event.

SERVPRO Of Lincoln Assists With Winter Storm Cleanup

9/13/2018 (Permalink)

Storm Damage SERVPRO Of Lincoln Assists With Winter Storm Cleanup Husker Power!

Winter Storm Cleanup and Restoration

Cold weather, snow and ice storms can cause severe damage to your home or business. When these types of disasters strike, immediate action is necessary to prevent additional damage to your property. SERVPRO of Lincoln has the winter storm experience, expertise, and the resources to remediate damage caused by winter weather. A few examples are:

Frozen Pipes

Extreme cold weather can cause pipes to freeze and burst. In general, pipes are more likely to freeze when the temperature is below 20 degrees Fahrenheit. The resulting water damage can be extensive. Outdoor pipes and pipes in unheated areas of the home can freeze if they are not properly insulated or if temperatures are severely cold. SERVPRO can quickly and safely repair water damage caused by frozen pipes.

Outdoor pipes most likely to freeze include:

  • Outdoor hose bibs
  • Swimming pool supply lines
  • Water sprinkler lines

Pipes in unheated or partially heated areas are also at risk of freezing, including:

  • Basements
  • Crawl spaces
  • Garages

Ice Dams

An ice dam is formed when snow melts unevenly on a roof and refreezes into a dam at the edge of the roof, near the eaves. This dam prevents any further snowmelt from draining off of the roof. This standing water can back up under shingles, leak into a home, and cause significant water damage to ceilings, walls, and other areas. Ice dams can also tear off gutters and loosen shingles.

Roof Damage

Snow and ice can cause significant damage to your gutters and roof. The additional weight of snow and ice can even cause a roof to collapse. When there’s a cold snap, water can get into cracks and small spaces and expand when it freezes, causing larger cracks and more damage. The repetition of freezing and thawing cycles can cause small cracks to get larger.

Damage from Cold Weather or Winter Storm? Call SERVPRO of Lincoln 402-466-4004

SERVPRO of Lincoln Can Dry Your Beatrice, NE Crawlspace!

9/7/2018 (Permalink)

  • To dry out a Beatrice, NE crawlspace, we first have to remove the water. That is not usually a problem, but since this is a storm, the ground is going to be very wet and possibly damaged. SERVPRO technicians understand that means multiple, water-filled low spots. It can be difficult to bring in hoses even in a large crawl space to syphon out the pooling water. 
     
    The next step is to lower the humidity as much as possible. Bringing in a dehumidifier is not usually an option, just like pump hoses. We can set up dehumidifiers with flexible plastic conduits to direct the moist air from the space to the exterior. We can also place containers with chemical desiccants in the crawlspace to absorb water from the air. If possible, we set up an air mover above the crawlspace and blow in warm, dry air to displace the damp air we attempt to draw out using an exhaust fan. 
     
    Now that we removed the water, SERVPRO technicians encapsulate the crawlspace once the moisture level and soil dampness have been reduced to normal levels. We cover the dirt floor with polyethylene sheets and a polyester mesh for reinforcement. This 12 mil plastic guard covering prevents moisture from leeching up from the ground. 
     
    After a foundation expert finishes seal the walls, the polyethylene sheets and polyester mesh floor are sealed to them with waterproof, foundation tape. 
     
    Drying out a wet crawlspace is not an easy task. It takes a professional service to remove the water and prevent further intrusion from future storms. To see how we can protect your home, call SERVPRO of Lincoln (402) 466-4004 today. We are here for you.

Protect Yourself AFTER A Storm

9/6/2018 (Permalink)

A few things to keep in mind following storm damage:

Unfortunately, an increase in the number of storm-related claims may lead to an increase in the number of unscrupulous roofers and contractors who are willing to take advantage of homeowners. It is very important for you to be cautious when dealing with contractors who offer to repair your home. Some tips:

  • Only do business with licensed contractors with good references.
  • Always request a written, detailed estimate.
  • Never pay for work up front, nor make any payments in cash.
  • Never sign a contract with spaces left blank.
  • What is their business address? If the company has a PO Box or doesn't have a local address, they probably aren't a local company.
  • Ask about some references for work they have done in this area. Local companies should have plenty of projects you can see in the area.
  • If in doubt about anything you are being asked to sign by a contractor, don’t be afraid to ask questions. Don’t feel pressured into signing anything. Take time to do your research, and if you are unsure about anything in the agreement, WAIT until you’ve had an opportunity to look it over more carefully and discuss it with your insurance agent or adjuster.

Be Ready For Spring Storms!

3/20/2018 (Permalink)

Understand Severe Weather Alerts

Do you know the difference between a National Weather Service Severe Thunderstorm Watch and a Severe Thunderstorm Warning? Check your knowledge below.

Severe Thunderstorm Watch: Be Prepared! 

Severe thunderstorms are possible in and near the watch area. Stay informed and be ready to act if a severe thunderstorm warning is issued. The watch area is typically large, covering numerous counties or even states.

Severe Thunderstorm Warning:

Take Action! Severe weather has been reported by spotters or indicated by radar. Warnings indicate imminent danger to life and property. Take shelter in a substantial building. Get out of mobile homes that can blow over in high winds. Warnings typically encompass a much smaller area (around the size of a city or small county) that may be impacted by a large hail or damaging wind identified by an NWS forecaster on radar or by a trained spotter/law enforcement who is watching the storm.

Prepare! Don't Let Severe Weather Take You by Surprise

Find out what you can do before severe weather strikes. Preparation is key to staying safe and minimizing impacts.

  • Be Weather-Ready: Check the forecast regularly to see if you're at risk for severe weather. Listen to local news or a NOAA Weather Radioto stay informed about severe thunderstorm watches and warnings. Check the Weather-Ready Nation for tips.
  • Sign Up for Notifications: Know how your community sends warning. Some communities have outdoor sirens. Others depend on media and smart phones to alert residents to severe storms.
  • Create a Communications Plan: Have a family plan that includes an emergency meeting place and related information. Pick a safe room in your home such as a basement, storm cellar or an interior room on the lowest floor with no windows. Get more ideas for a plan at: https://www.ready.gov/make-a-plan
  • Practice Your Plan: Conduct a family severe thunderstorm drill regularly so everyone knows what to do if a damaging wind or large hail is approaching. Make sure all members of your family know to go there when severe thunderstorm warnings are issued. Don't forget pets if time allows. 
    Prepare Your Home : Keep trees and branches trimmed near your house. If you have time before severe weather hits, secure loose objects, close windows and doors, and move any valuable objects inside or under a sturdy structure.
    Help Your Neighbor: Encourage your loved ones to prepare for severe thunderstorms. Take CPR training so you can help if someone is hurt during severe weather.

What to Do During Severe Weather

Acting quickly is key to staying safe and minimizing impacts.

  • Stay Weather Ready: Continue to listen to local news or a NOAA Weather Radio to stay updated about severe thunderstorm watches and warnings.
  • At Your House: Go to your secure location if you hear a severe thunderstorm warning. Damaging wind or large hail may be approaching. Take your pets with you if time allows.
  • At Your Workplace or School: Stay away from windows if you are in a severe thunderstorm warning and damaging wind or large hail is approaching. Do not go to large open rooms such as cafeterias, gymnasiums or auditoriums.
  • Outside: Go inside a sturdy building immediately if severe thunderstorms are approaching. Sheds and storage facilities are not safe. Taking shelter under a tree can be deadly. The tree may fall on you. Standing under a tree also put you at a greater risk of getting struck by lightning.
  • In a Vehicle: Being in a vehicle during severe thunderstorms is safer than being outside; however, drive to closest secure shelter if there is sufficient time.

What to Do After Severe Weather

What should you do when the lightning and thunder stops and it looks likes the severe thunderstorm is over?

  • Stay Informed: Continue listening to local news or a NOAA Weather Radio to stay updated about severe thunderstorm watches and warnings. More severe thunderstorms could be headed your way.
  • Contact Your Family and Loved Ones: Let your family and close friends know that you're okay so they can help spread the word. Text messages or social media are more reliable forms of communication than phone calls.
  • Assess the Damage: After you are sure the severe weather threat has ended, check your property for damages. When walking through storm damage, wear long pants, a long-sleeved shirt and sturdy shoes. Contact local authorities if you see power lines down. Stay out of damaged buildings. Be aware of insurance scammers if your property has been damaged.
  • Help Your Neighbor: If you come across people that are injured and you are properly trained, if needed, provide first aid to victims until emergency responders arrive.

 Information found at http://www.nws.noaa.gov/om/thunderstorm/

SERVPRO of Lincoln Is Ready When The Storm Hits!

12/21/2017 (Permalink)

SERVPRO of Lincoln specializes in storm and flood damage restoration.  Our crews are highly trained and we use specialized equipment to restore your property to its pre-storm condition.

Faster Response

Since we are locally owned and operated, we are able to respond quicker with the right resources, which is extremely important. A fast response lessens the damage, limits further damage, and reduces the restoration cost.

Resources to Handle Floods and Storms

When storms hit Southeast Nebraska, from Seward to Ashland to Beatrice, we can scale our resources to handle a large storm or flooding disaster. We can access equipment and personnel from a network of 1,650 Franchises across the country.

Have Storm or Flood Damage? Call SERVPRO of Lincoln Today 402-466-4004

Beware Lightning During A Thundersnow Event!

12/21/2017 (Permalink)

Thundersnow. Strong winter snowstorms and blizzards commonly produce lightning strikes, a phenomenon referred to as 'thundersnow'. More uncommon than spring and summer thunderstorms, thunder snows do occur in the Midwest, and they are bred by the same unstable weather conditions. Essentially, they are thunderstorms that occur in colder months, and they are accompanied by thunder and lightning. Lightning and thunder can occur with any type of winter precipitation - including snow, sleet ('thundersleet') and freezing rain.

The storm of Oct 1997 in Lincoln, NE was a thundersnow event and dumped over 13 inches of wet snow.  If this event happens again, SERVPRO of Lincoln will be ready!

Faster Response

Since we are locally owned and operated, we are able to respond quicker with the right resources, which is extremely important. A fast response lessens the damage, limits further damage, and reduces the restoration cost.

Call SERVPRO of Lincoln If You Have Storm Damage!

9/15/2017 (Permalink)

SERVPRO of Lincoln, NE specializes in storm and flood damage restoration.  Our crews are highly trained and we use specialized equipment to restore your property to its pre-storm condition.

Faster Response

Since we are locally owned and operated, we are able to respond quicker with the right resources, which is extremely important. A fast response lessens the damage, limits further damage, and reduces the restoration cost.

Resources to Handle Floods and Storms

When storms hit Lincoln, we can scale our resources to handle a large storm or flooding disaster. We can access equipment and personnel from a network of 1,650 Franchises across the country and elite Disaster Recovery Teams (http://www.SERVPROlincolneast.com/disaster-recovery) that are strategically located throughout the United States.

Have Storm or Flood Damage? Call Us Today at 402-466-4004

Think You Know Everything About Tornadoes?

9/15/2017 (Permalink)

What Causes Tornadoes?
Thunderstorms develop in warm, moist air in advance of eastward-moving cold fronts. These thunderstorms often produce large hail, strong winds, and tornadoes. Tornadoes in the winter and early spring are often associated with strong, frontal systems that form in the Central States and move east. During the spring in the Central Plains, thunderstorms frequently develop along a "dryline," which separates very warm, moist air to the east from hot, dry air to the west. Tornado-producing thunderstorms may form as the dryline moves east during the afternoon hours. 

How Do Tornadoes Form?
Before thunderstorms develop, a change in wind direction and an increase in wind speed with increasing height creates an invisible, horizontal spinning effect in the lower atmosphere.  Rising air within the thunderstorm updraft tilts the rotating air from horizontal to vertical.  An area of rotation, 2 - 6 miles wide, now extends through much of the storm. Most strong and violent tornadoes form within this area of strong rotation

Tornadoes Take Many Shapes and Sizes
Weak Tornadoes

  • 69% of all tornadoes
  • Less than 5% of tornado deaths
  • Lifetime 1-10+ minutes
  • Winds less than 110 mph

Strong Tornadoes

  • 29% of all tornadoes
  • Nearly 30% of all tornado deaths
  • May last 20 minutes or longer
  • Winds 110-205 mph

Violent Tornadoes

  • Only 2% of all tornadoes
  • 70% of all tornado deaths
  • Lifetime can exceed 1 hour
  • Winds greater than 205 mph

Tornado Myths:
MYTH: Areas near rivers, lakes and mountains are safe from tornadoes. 
FACT: No place is safe from tornadoes. In the late 1980's, a tornado swept through Yellowstone National Park leaving a path of destruction up and down a 10,000 ft. mountain.
MYTH: The low pressure with a tornado causes buildings to "explode" as the tornado passes overhead. 
FACT: Violent winds and debris slamming into buildings cause most structural damage.
MYTH: Windows should be opened before a tornado approaches to equalize pressure and minimize damage. 
FACT: Opening windows allows damaging winds to enter the structure. Leave the windows alone; instead, immediately go to a safe place.

Tornadoes can occur at any time of the year

  • In the southern states, peak tornado occurrence is in March through May, while peak months in the northern states are during the summer.
  • Note, in some states, a secondary tornado maximum occurs in the fall.
  • Tornadoes are most likely to occur between 3 and 9 p.m. but have been known to occur at all hours of the day or night.
  • The average tornado moves from southwest to northeast, but tornadoes have been known to move in any direction. The average forward speed is 30 mph but may vary from nearly stationary to 70 mph.
  • The total number of tornadoes is probably higher than indicated in the western states. Sparse population reduces the number reported.

SERVPRO of Lincoln Wants You To Be Storm Ready!

9/15/2017 (Permalink)

Severe weather can happen anytime, anywhere. Each year, Americans cope with an average of:

    • 10,000 severe thunderstorms
    • 5,000 floods or flash floods
    • 1,000 tornadoes
    • 2 land falling deadly hurricanes

Approximately 98% of all declared disasters (by the president) are weather-related, leading to around 500 deaths per year and nearly $15 billion in damage*. Knowing your risk of severe weather, taking a few actions and being an example to others are just a few steps you can take to be better prepared to save your life and assist in saving the lives of others.

Know your risk.  The first step to becoming weather-ready is to understand the type of hazardous weather that can affect where you live and work, and how the weather could impact you, your business and your family. Check the weather forecast regularly, obtain a NOAA Weather Radio, and learn about Wireless Emergency Alerts. Severe weather comes in many forms and your shelter plan should include all types of local hazards.

Take Action.  Take the next step in severe weather preparedness by creating a communication plan for your home and business. Put together or purchase an emergency kit. Keep important papers and valuables in a safe place.

Be an Example.  Once you have taken action to prepare for severe weather, share your story with co-workers and family and friends on Facebook or Twitter. Your preparedness story will inspire others to do the same.

Build an Emergency Supply Kit:

    • Water (one gallon per person per day)
    • Food (non-perishable 3-day supply)
    • Manual can opener
    • Battery operated radio, preferably a NOAA Weather Radio
    • Flashlight and extra batteries
    • First aid kit
    • Whistle to signal for help
    • Clothing
    • Dust masks or bandannas
    • Plastic sheeting, garbage bags and duct tape
    • Wrench or pliers to turn off utilities
    • Hygiene items
    • Important documents; copies of insurance policies, identification and bank account information
    • Cash
    • Fire extinguisher
    • Matches in a waterproof container

NOTE:  Statistics gathered from www.stormready.noaa.gov

How To Prevent Further Storm Damage

9/15/2017 (Permalink)

Prevent Further Storm Damage By Using Certified Technicians 

While storm damage may have happened on only one side or corner of your home, that damage can quickly spread. Water that has been able to enter during the storm through any openings created by falling trees or broken glass can evaporate and find its way into other rooms, and even onto other levels of your home.

Removing Storm Damage and the Mess it Makes Should be Done Carefully and Professionally

Storm damage can cause unexpected hazards. If your Lincoln home or small business has experienced storm damage, you should not attempt to clean the debris up yourself. We have professional technicians who are trained in clearing away the debris. We have experience in extracting standing water, cleaning water damaged items and structures, and can help prevent mold growth.

Cleaning alone is often not enough, as storm damage and subsequent rainfall will damage interior structures. We can prevent much of the damage, and repair what has already taken place. Repairs and restoration work can be done so that the new materials match the original ones. We have training and certification in restorative work that makes this possible.

From removing the debris to final restorative touches, we can quickly make things look “Like they never even happened,” ensuring you and your family can return to your home safely. The same goes for your small business or office. Don't let storm damage ruin your home or your business. 

For storm damage clean up and repairs, call SERVPRO of Lincoln 24/7 at (402) 466-4004. We will respond to your emergency as quickly as possible to start cleaning up the debris and repairing the damage.

What Do You Know About Tornadoes?

5/6/2016 (Permalink)

Although tornadoes occur in many parts of the world, these destructive forces of nature are found most frequently in the United States east of the Rocky Mountains during the spring and summer months. In an average year, 800 tornadoes are reported nationwide, resulting in 80 deaths and over 1,500 injuries. A tornado is defined as a violently rotating column of air extending from a thunderstorm to the ground. The most violent tornadoes are capable of tremendous destruction with wind speeds of 250 mph or more. Damage paths can be in excess of one mile wide and 50 miles long. Once a tornado in Broken Bow, Oklahoma, carried a motel sign 30 miles and dropped it in Arkansas!

What Causes Tornadoes?
Thunderstorms develop in warm, moist air in advance of eastward-moving cold fronts. These thunderstorms often produce large hail, strong winds, and tornadoes. Tornadoes in the winter and early spring are often associated with strong, frontal systems that form in the Central States and move east. During the spring in the Central Plains, thunderstorms frequently develop along a "dryline," which separates very warm, moist air to the east from hot, dry air to the west. Tornado-producing thunderstorms may form as the dryline moves east during the afternoon hours. 

How Do Tornadoes Form?
Before thunderstorms develop, a change in wind direction and an increase in wind speed with increasing height creates an invisible, horizontal spinning effect in the lower atmosphere.  Rising air within the thunderstorm updraft tilts the rotating air from horizontal to vertical.  An area of rotation, 2 - 6 miles wide, now extends through much of the storm. Most strong and violent tornadoes form within this area of strong rotation

Tornadoes Take Many Shapes and Sizes
Weak Tornadoes
  • 69% of all tornadoes
  • Less than 5% of tornado deaths
  • Lifetime 1-10+ minutes
  • Winds less than 110 mph
Strong Tornadoes
  • 29% of all tornadoes
  • Nearly 30% of all tornado deaths
  • May last 20 minutes or longer
  • Winds 110-205 mph
Violent Tornadoes
  • Only 2% of all tornadoes
  • 70% of all tornado deaths
  • Lifetime can exceed 1 hour
  • Winds greater than 205 mph

Tornado Myths:
MYTH: Areas near rivers, lakes and mountains are safe from tornadoes. 
FACT: No place is safe from tornadoes. In the late 1980's, a tornado swept through Yellowstone National Park leaving a path of destruction up and down a 10,000 ft. mountain.
MYTH: The low pressure with a tornado causes buildings to "explode" as the tornado passes overhead. 
FACT: Violent winds and debris slamming into buildings cause most structural damage.
MYTH: Windows should be opened before a tornado approaches to equalize pressure and minimize damage. 
FACT: Opening windows allows damaging winds to enter the structure. Leave the windows alone; instead, immediately go to a safe place.

Tornadoes can occur at any time of the year

  • In the southern states, peak tornado occurrence is in March through May, while peak months in the northern states are during the summer.
  • Note, in some states, a secondary tornado maximum occurs in the fall.
  • Tornadoes are most likely to occur between 3 and 9 p.m. but have been known to occur at all hours of the day or night.
  • The average tornado moves from southwest to northeast, but tornadoes have been known to move in any direction. The average forward speed is 30 mph but may vary from nearly stationary to 70 mph.
  • The total number of tornadoes is probably higher than indicated in the western states. Sparse population reduces the number reported.
What to Listen For...
  • SEVERE THUNDERSTORM WATCH: Severe thunderstorms are possible in your area.
  • SEVERE THUNDERSTORM WARNING: Severe thunderstorms are occurring.
  • TORNADO WATCH: Tornadoes are possible in your area. Remain alert for approaching storms.
  • TORNADO WARNING: A tornado has been sighted or indicated by weather radar. If a tornado warning is issued for your area and the sky becomes threatening, move to your pre-designated place of safety.
Remember, tornadoes occasionally develop in areas in which a severe thunderstorm watch or warning is in effect. Remain alert to signs of an approaching tornado and seek shelter if threatening conditions exist. Environmental CluesLook out for:
  • Dark, often greenish sky
  • Wall cloud
  • Large hail
  • Loud roar; similar to a freight train
Caution:Some tornadoes appear as a visible funnel extending only partially to the ground.
Some tornadoes are clearly visible while others are obscured by rain or nearby low-hanging clouds. It's Up to YOU! 
Each year, many people are killed or seriously injured by tornadoes despite advance warning. Some did not hear the warning while others received the warning but did not believe a tornado would actually affect them. This preparedness information, combined with timely severe weather watches and warnings, could save your life in the event a tornado threatens your area. After you have received the warning or observed threatening skies, YOU must make the decision to seek shelter before the storm arrives. It could be the most important decision you will ever make.

When Storms or Floods hit Lincoln, NE, SERVPRO is ready!

4/27/2016 (Permalink)

Storm Damage When Storms or Floods hit Lincoln, NE, SERVPRO is ready! Our highly trained crews are ready to respond 24/7 to storm or flood damage in Lincoln, NE

SERVPRO ofLincoln, NE specializes in storm and flood damage restoration.  Our crews are highly trained and we use specialized equipment to restore your property to its pre-storm condition.

Faster Response

Since we are locally owned and operated, we are able to respond quicker with the right resources, which is extremely important. A fast response lessens the damage, limits further damage, and reduces the restoration cost.

Resources to Handle Floods and Storms

When storms hit Lincoln, we can scale our resources to handle a large storm or flooding disaster. We can access equipment and personnel from a network of 1,650 Franchises across the country and elite Disaster Recovery Teams (http://www.SERVPROlincolneast.com/disaster-recovery) that are strategically located throughout the United States.

Have Storm or Flood Damage? Call Us Today at 402-466-4004